Have a look around…

As i sat down to re-design my site for probably the sixth or seventh time since 1995 or so, it became apparent that building yet another static site from scratch just wasn’t going to cut it. The same applied to re-populating my printed portfolio with my latest work. Cracking open the old InDesign file and pulling all those photos and complied artwork out of the archives was becoming a major chore with over 15 years of work stacking up.

Since i started dabbling a bit with using WordPress for a dynamic, content-driven site, i thought it might be interesting to see if i could make it work for more of an “archival” site such as this.

It took some tinkering, but i think i figured out a way to make it work. Below is a random selection of case studies spanning the full breadth and depth of my portfolio. This will keep the landing page dynamic and constantly changing. You can click through to read them, but you can also use the menus to the left to explore all of my posted work by business sector or by work category. This gives the audience (that would be you) the ability to navigate vertically or laterally through my work, with a random option as well. :)

The beauty of this format is that all of the content is here in a database, and it’s now completely separated from the look and feel of the site. When it’s time to freshen up the look, it’s a matter of just updating the templates or applying a new theme, and it’s done.

There is something nice about presenting a printed portfolio of work… seeing a career’s worth of work collected into one book is quite gratifying. But the time investment vs. the return on that investment didn’t seem to make sense any more. Yes, i’ve invested a HUGE amount of time getting this latest site redesign up and running, but it’s an investment that should pay off down the road as future updates will be almost trivially easy.

Besides, this also gives me an excuse to buy an iPad to present my portfolio. ;)

Check back soon for more changes and updates, and feel free to drop me a line!

Sector:
Categories: Uncategorized

TIFF: Promoting the ‘festival of festivals’

For the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival, we were asked to come up with a promotional campaign that would reach new audiences.

We developed a campaign that focused on having the audience self-identify as their favourite genre. The ticket mnemonic with “Admit one” tagline was a play on words, instructing the festival to admit films of that genre, but also giving the viewer permission to “admit” to their cinematic guilty pleasure. Rather than using strict “Academy” film genres, we opted to go for more colloquial terms, to make it feel more like a grass-roots campaign.


We envisioned a teaser campaign prior to the launch, asking the question, “WHO ARE YOU?” The campaign would then launch with an extensive postering campaign, with the posters being mounted using staples instead of glue, in order to encourage people to steal the ones they liked. T-shirts would also be available for every genre, allowing people to further “self-brand” themselves with the festival nomenclature. The campaign would have branched out into print, film trailers, the Web and social media.

The visual pun could even be extended to the festival volunteers’ t-shirts, which could read “I AM VOLUNTEERING.”

Ultimately, the festival directors couldn’t get past the “I AM” statement, believing it was too close to a long-extinct beer campaign slogan (despite a very different execution), so this concept unfortunately died before launch.

Decibel Guitars visual identity: One louder

In 1988, i was a teenager obsessed with guitars. (I had always been more interested in the instrument and gear than in actually learning how to be a proficient player.) A friend told me about a guitar shop in Toronto that occasionally offered courses in guitar construction. I followed up on that tip and enrolled in a 10-week course to build my first guitar. I was hooked.

But being on a career trajectory to be a graphic designer, it was too late in my high school career to switch directions, so building guitars was a dream that would have to wait. In the intervening decades, i continued to refine designs with the hope of eventually building again once i got access to a shop.

In 2009, Decibel Guitars was launched.

Decibel Guitars logo

Things are off to a slow but steady start, and the designs have been very well received. You can read (and see) more over at the Decibel Guitars website.

Decibel has also been an opportunity for me to exercise the power and potential of social media, with active Facebook and Twitter content driving traffic to the site and acting as open, two-way conduits of communication between myself and potential customers.

Six String Nation: Striking an “eh” chord



The Six String Nation guitar and related projects were conceived in 1995 by Peabody Award winning writer and broadcaster Jowi Taylor, inspired by the looming Quebec Referendum of that year and by the commitment of luthier George Rizsanyi to the value of Canadian woods over the usually preferred exotics. The guitar was to be made entirely of woods and materials from every province and territory, including many of incredible historical and cultural significance. (Read the whole story over at the Six String Nation site.)

Everybody who heard and was moved by the compelling story volunteered their time to help bring this vision to fruition. I was honoured to be asked to create the visual identity for this truly inspiring project. The chosen identity was envisioned as the view from inside the guitar, looking out through the soundhole at the passing Canadian landscape, with the strings resonating into a subtle suggestion of the shape of a maple leaf.


At the Toronto launch of the guitar in 2006, i was even more humbled to learn that the logo was inlaid into the guitar itself and embroidered on the strap. In 2009, the Royal Canadian Mint also honoured the Six String Nation with a guitar pick-shaped coin featuring the rosette designed by luthier George Rizsanyi and the Six String Nation logo reproduced holographically in the middle of the coin. Also in 2009, Douglas & McIntyre published a book documenting the development of the guitar, the history behind some of the materials, some fascinating stories of the guitar’s travels, and photographs of some of the thousands of Canadians who have held, played and had their pictures taken with this cultural icon.

It was a tremendous honour to be invited to share in the creation of such an important and significant Canadian cultural artifact.

Sector:
Categories: Brand & Identity, Design

CUMIS Group: Here for you

When we got the call from CUMIS, we were intrigued. From the appearance and colour scheme of their logo to the placement of their corporate headquarters in the middle of an apple orchard overlooking Highway 403 in Burlington, Ontario, it was easy to think that they manufactured farm machinery. As we were soon to learn, we were not the first (nor the last) to make that mistake.

CUMIS has operated in the insurance space for over 75 years, serving the credit union space exclusively, with a commanding market position. But decades of the status quo had left the brand somewhat directionless and unfocused.

The first goal was to revamp the logo itself. The name itself (believed to have originated as an acronym for Credit Union Members’ Insurance Society) had pronunciation issues, and the look was pure 1970s brutalist-industrial, depicted in dull mustard yellow on white.

With the new identity, we sought to bring emphasis to the “U” in order to force its pronunciation as a long vowel sound. We also wanted to bring some symbolism to the identity without actually creating a symbol. The change was to be evolutionary, so we needed to keep the mark of identity as a typographic solution only.

The solution was to treat the “U” as if it were a loop of ribbon, one side red and one side gold. These two halves were then split and allowed to “cradle” one another, in a gesture similar to hands cradling, protecting, nurturing, representing the goals of an organization offering insurance and wealth management products and services.

Printed collaterial pieces were another trouble area. When viewed together, all of their brochures and other communications pieces had absolutely no family resemblance at all. They almost looked like they came from completely separate companies.

It wasn’t hard to see that they had a serious brand image problem. This was in part due to: a) the core values that helped to define the brand becoming lost; b) product managers who viewed their departments as “sub-brands” and believing that their needs were different from everyone else’s; and c) an internal creative department lacking inspiration and having grown accustomed to product managers art-directing the creative. Working with the CUMIS Marketing & Communications team, we set out to address each of these issues in an integrated way.

As we set about creating a new visual language for the CUMIS brand, we recognized that key internal thought leaders and stakeholders needed to be brought in early in the process. By presenting and receiving approval on all creative direction from the executive level first, that “top-down” endorsement helped smooth the adoption of the refreshed brand throughout the organization, rather than having to push and fight to sell new concepts into the organization from the bottom up. Rather than creating “brand police” to monitor and control things, we wanted to create an entire organization of brand advocates who wanted to do everything possible to promote a strong and consistent brand.

We extended the “ribbon” idea from the identity into a visual motif that separated the masthead area of cover pages from the image and supporting content. These ribbons also extended to the interior of pieces. Generous use of white space also helped the elements stand on their own and not get lost in cluttered layouts.

Photography was to be used exclusively, with images portraying everyday Canadians engaged in activities together. The rationale was that insurance should allow people to go about living their lives in happiness, with the knowledge that should anything unexpected happen, the would be looked after, as would their businesses, property and loved ones. The sense of community reflected in many of the images was also intended to suggest a connection to the core values of the co-operative movement.

We often say that a brand is more than just the logo on the building. But in this case, refreshing the brand also included the logo on the building! The revitalization of the brand was extremely successful, and in 2009, The CUMIS Group was purchased by The Co-operators, who continue to operate the brand and serve the credit union sector.

Grocery Gateway: Enabling a new category



The brief for this project was interesting. The branding agency’s research showed that people liked the tangible elements of shopping for groceries. It was the logistical problems they didn’t care for… getting to the store, loading the kids into a cart, carrying bags, loading up the car with the bags (and the kids) and unloading it again once they got home. And those are the people with cars. Those stuck using taxis or public transit – or those unable to get out at all – faced even greater challenges.

Grocery Gateway’s revised positioning was to be more like a traditional grocer that just happens to be Internet-enabled. Every effort was made to have drivers work the same delivery routes, so you see the same face every time, helping establish that personal relationship between consumer and the grocer at the most critical touchpoint. The only difference being the consumer no longer has to physically travel to the store, and can now shop at home (or at work), at their leisure, any time of the day or night. Naked.

The refreshed visual identity features a cheerful delivery van (nicknamed “Little G” by the folks at Grocery Gateway) bouncing over the horizon. The bright colour palette and expressive illustration were designed to express that moment of joy when the groceries are delivered. Ten years later, it still feels fresh and fun.

Sector:
Categories: Brand & Identity, Design

From the vault: Various identities


Some of these were branding exercises that launched and then went in a different direction (or that vanished for one reason or another). Others were just creative exercises or playing around with ideas.

Top row: (left to right) Brand identity for an initiative by Cadillac Fairview to expand their IT reach into their retail properties by offering data and networking services to their tenants. // A creative accident turned into an exploration of a possible future visual identity direction for a Canadian television network. // Reactor art-directed the first few issues of a new hockey magazine. This was my contribution for consideration for the masthead.

Bottom row: (left to right) Brand naming and visual identity for an IT outsourcing joint venture between Capgemini and Hydro One. // Creative exercise to come up with a name and identity for consumer media free of digital rights management. // An data synchronization service where information becomes “loyal” to its owner, and changes get automatically pushed out through the network to subscribers. What better represents loyalty than a retriever?

Crest Whitestrips: Advocacy marketing

How do you create a promotional campaign for a product that’s difficult to sample? Create a grass-roots “consumer advocacy” program to get people to try the product and talk about their experiences with their peers.

Crest Whitestrips is one of those products that does not lend itself well to sampling, because results are only seen over a longer period. Therefore, knowing someone who has tried the product and liked it can be an important factor in the trial decision.



In developing the program, we researched potential partners, and discovered an excellent fit with Curves fitness clubs. Their members were in the right demographic for the program, but more importantly, they were people who had already made a commitment toward self-improvement, and according to P&G’s research, the target consumer for the teeth-whitening category in Canada was more interested in whitening to feel good about themselves than simply a cosmetic improvement.

We created a program in partnership with Curves to turn in-club advisors into product advocates. Each club was given sample product for the advisors to use, along with posters and newsletters and a $10 off coupon for product trial. The program also included branded apparel and an advisors manual with tips on how to engage members in conversation about the Crest line of whitening products.

The program was very successful and was renewed and expanded for a second year to include a Crest-sponsored a makeover contest for the Curves member with the best story about how having a great smile made a difference in their life.

Lavalife (Canada’s top online personals site) was also brought on as a partner as it represented another opportunity to speak directly with targeted audiences who were also engaged in life-changing activities. Crest sponsored the “send a smile” functionality within Lavalife, as well as a “Smile of the Month” contest with product prizing and a grand prize of a cruise. Targeted banners within the Lavalife environment also directed users to sign up to receive a $10 off coupon.

Strategic creative: Scenarios and concept development



Working closely with Capgemini’s Digital Asset Management consulting group in 2003, i led a creative team to collaborate and brainstorm over a couple of days to develop scenarios and storylines for a future media landscape 5 to 10 years into the future, specifically geared around consumption of media and how digital asset management (and rights management) technologies would play a role.

We developed a set of scenarios that touched on video, audio and printed media in a world with pervasive high-speed wireless networking, and where consumer media is accessed from the “cloud” rather than stored locally. (This was years before the concept of “cloud computing” would have been considered even remotely viable.)


We came up with a name, a visual identity, and mocked up several user interfaces that showed how media would follow the user and adapt itself to the context in which it was being played back or viewed… everything from desktop computers and mobile devices to home theatres and automotive systems.


The opportunity to stretch out and explore the thin edge was very exciting, and the scenarios gave the sales team something concrete which they could take out to clients and demonstrate our thinking.

Delta Hotels: A fresh change





Delta Hotels is one of the largest hotel management companies in Canada, and as they grew, they saw a need to update and refresh their brand and visual identity to better reflect their aspiration to be the best of the mid-tier segment of the hospitality industry. In addition to designing the identity, we applied it and the new visual language to everything from signage to advertising and printed collateral, loyalty programs and all the miscellaneous amenities you encounter in a hotel… matchbooks, bathrobes, soap and shampoo… if it could be branded, we did it.

Sector:
Categories: Brand & Identity, Design