Have a look around…

As i sat down to re-design my site for probably the sixth or seventh time since 1995 or so, it became apparent that building yet another static site from scratch just wasn’t going to cut it. The same applied to re-populating my printed portfolio with my latest work. Cracking open the old InDesign file and pulling all those photos and complied artwork out of the archives was becoming a major chore with over 15 years of work stacking up.

Since i started dabbling a bit with using WordPress for a dynamic, content-driven site, i thought it might be interesting to see if i could make it work for more of an “archival” site such as this.

It took some tinkering, but i think i figured out a way to make it work. Below is a random selection of case studies spanning the full breadth and depth of my portfolio. This will keep the landing page dynamic and constantly changing. You can click through to read them, but you can also use the menus to the left to explore all of my posted work by business sector or by work category. This gives the audience (that would be you) the ability to navigate vertically or laterally through my work, with a random option as well. :)

The beauty of this format is that all of the content is here in a database, and it’s now completely separated from the look and feel of the site. When it’s time to freshen up the look, it’s a matter of just updating the templates or applying a new theme, and it’s done.

There is something nice about presenting a printed portfolio of work… seeing a career’s worth of work collected into one book is quite gratifying. But the time investment vs. the return on that investment didn’t seem to make sense any more. Yes, i’ve invested a HUGE amount of time getting this latest site redesign up and running, but it’s an investment that should pay off down the road as future updates will be almost trivially easy.

Besides, this also gives me an excuse to buy an iPad to present my portfolio. 😉

Check back soon for more changes and updates, and feel free to drop me a line!

Categories: Uncategorized

Visa Canada: Leveraging cultural sponsorship

Sonar was instrumental in getting Visa into the sponsorship of film festivals. But the art of sponsorship is more than just getting the logo onto the media wall. Sonar created custom content – originally syndicated radio programming, which later evolved into online video features – starting in 2005 as a way of leveraging Visa’s sponsorship of the Toronto International Film Festival into increased earned media impressions.

The Red Carpet Radio syndicated reports from the festival were morning-after recaps of the previous night’s activity at the Visa Screening Room. These were picked up by radio stations across North America and abroad. The earned media impressions of every “live from the Visa Screening Room” on-air mention tallied up to hundreds of millions of impressions – impressive numbers for a fairly modest sponsorship investment.

As Red Carpet Radio evolved, it became a video feature, with major exclusive distribution partners. The content is professionally produced (it was shot in HD in 2010), and is shot live at gala screenings, then edited uploaded and distributed within hours, where TIFF fans can see the night’s activity before the night is over.

Online activities are supported by offline contests and promotions to drive further traffic to the redcarpetdiary.tv site and further increase the value of Visa’s sponsorship investment.

BlackBerry theme design

I’ve been interested in design for small screens for quite a while. The resolution and user input constraints have always presented unique challenges from a design and user experience perspective.

Of course, as screen resolutions, graphic processing power, touch screens, alternate pointing devices and full QWERTY keyboards have become increasingly common, many of those requirements and limitations have been eased (or eliminated altogether) but new input methodologies have also meant new challenges and new UX paradigms that need to evolve to address the ever-changing state of human-computer interaction.

When RIM moved more into the consumer space with the introduction of the BlackBerry Pearl in 1995, i took interest. But it wasn’t for a couple of years that i started delving into theme design for BlackBerry handhelds for my own personal use.

My first run at it was heavily influenced by the iPhone’s user interface, but i opted to not use any Apple intellectual property, unlike other theme designers, who simply cropped icons out of Apple screen shots, and most other elements fell short of the same level of polish.

The visual language i began with glassTile prompted me to expand it out into a cleaner, original theme family that ended up with three “metal” variants as well as red and pink themes based off the same iconography. These were made commercially available and they were purchased by several thousand happy users.

The themes were all based around the same concept of having a “horizon line” splitting the screen into defined areas. There is a clean “status bar” at the top, showing signal and battery strength, carrier info and small icons for secondary functionality such as Bluetooth. The “dashboard” area above the horizon line features a prominently positioned clock in a modern, flush-left position, as well as date information and the profile icon.

These themes were, of course, based primarily on my own preferences for information hierarchy, but it felt completely natural and intuitive. The position of the horizon line was designed to allow consistency of the menu bar and dashboard on subsequent screens for phone lists and in-call displays.

Delta Hotels: A fresh change

Delta Hotels is one of the largest hotel management companies in Canada, and as they grew, they saw a need to update and refresh their brand and visual identity to better reflect their aspiration to be the best of the mid-tier segment of the hospitality industry. In addition to designing the identity, we applied it and the new visual language to everything from signage to advertising and printed collateral, loyalty programs and all the miscellaneous amenities you encounter in a hotel… matchbooks, bathrobes, soap and shampoo… if it could be branded, we did it.

Categories: Brand & Identity, Design

Caramilk: A ‘secret’ identity

At Reactor, we had the pleasure of doing a lot of collaborative work with various agencies. One assignment that came in was to develop a mnemonic device or visual identity that could be used in campaigns that centred around “The Caramilk Secret”. After a few rounds of creative exploration, this is what we ended up with. The agency Photoshopped in an actual Caramilk square over my illustrated version, but other than that minor change, this iconic symbol is still in use over a decade later, appearing in TV and print advertising, point-of-sale promotional displays, online contests and packaging.

Strategic creative: Scenarios and concept development

Working closely with Capgemini’s Digital Asset Management consulting group in 2003, i led a creative team to collaborate and brainstorm over a couple of days to develop scenarios and storylines for a future media landscape 5 to 10 years into the future, specifically geared around consumption of media and how digital asset management (and rights management) technologies would play a role.

We developed a set of scenarios that touched on video, audio and printed media in a world with pervasive high-speed wireless networking, and where consumer media is accessed from the “cloud” rather than stored locally. (This was years before the concept of “cloud computing” would have been considered even remotely viable.)

We came up with a name, a visual identity, and mocked up several user interfaces that showed how media would follow the user and adapt itself to the context in which it was being played back or viewed… everything from desktop computers and mobile devices to home theatres and automotive systems.

The opportunity to stretch out and explore the thin edge was very exciting, and the scenarios gave the sales team something concrete which they could take out to clients and demonstrate our thinking.

Vintage Inns: Revitalizing luxury experiences

The revitalization of the tourism industry in Niagara-on-the-Lake is the stuff of Canadian business legend.

But over a decade after the infusion of new investment into the region began, the pace began to falter somewhat, and new management at Vintage Inns realized that the bulk of their marketing and branding dollars were being spent promoting the town and the region, which was good for business – all business, in fact, including their competitors in the hotel and B&B space.

The new brand image for Vintage Inns – which left the identity and character of the three landmark hotels intact – brought new focus to the level of detail and individuality in the experiences people could find there. Fashion-inspired photography, experientially-driven copy and premium printing resulted in a collective warmth and sophistication that was previously lacking in their branded materials.

Targeted radio and print advertising sought to bring people in the GTA back to Niagara-on-the- Lake for unique experiences and quick escapes.

The online experience was re-vamped, giving more direct access to the reservation engine, while targeted banner advertising, e-newsletters and partnership programs helped drive new traffic to the site.

TIFF: Promoting the ‘festival of festivals’

For the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival, we were asked to come up with a promotional campaign that would reach new audiences.

We developed a campaign that focused on having the audience self-identify as their favourite genre. The ticket mnemonic with “Admit one” tagline was a play on words, instructing the festival to admit films of that genre, but also giving the viewer permission to “admit” to their cinematic guilty pleasure. Rather than using strict “Academy” film genres, we opted to go for more colloquial terms, to make it feel more like a grass-roots campaign.

We envisioned a teaser campaign prior to the launch, asking the question, “WHO ARE YOU?” The campaign would then launch with an extensive postering campaign, with the posters being mounted using staples instead of glue, in order to encourage people to steal the ones they liked. T-shirts would also be available for every genre, allowing people to further “self-brand” themselves with the festival nomenclature. The campaign would have branched out into print, film trailers, the Web and social media.

The visual pun could even be extended to the festival volunteers’ t-shirts, which could read “I AM VOLUNTEERING.”

Ultimately, the festival directors couldn’t get past the “I AM” statement, believing it was too close to a long-extinct beer campaign slogan (despite a very different execution), so this concept unfortunately died before launch.

ePhysician portal concept: Changing health care

Capgemini was preparing a joint pitch with HP in response to an eHealth initiative at Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. As part of our response, visual mockups were created to present a conceptual framework of potential functionality and user experience, as a way of framing discussion and opening dialogue with the client. While integrated records management has still not been implemented in the province, this concept shows some of the power and potential of an integrated approach.

Crest Whitestrips: Advocacy marketing

How do you create a promotional campaign for a product that’s difficult to sample? Create a grass-roots “consumer advocacy” program to get people to try the product and talk about their experiences with their peers.

Crest Whitestrips is one of those products that does not lend itself well to sampling, because results are only seen over a longer period. Therefore, knowing someone who has tried the product and liked it can be an important factor in the trial decision.

In developing the program, we researched potential partners, and discovered an excellent fit with Curves fitness clubs. Their members were in the right demographic for the program, but more importantly, they were people who had already made a commitment toward self-improvement, and according to P&G’s research, the target consumer for the teeth-whitening category in Canada was more interested in whitening to feel good about themselves than simply a cosmetic improvement.

We created a program in partnership with Curves to turn in-club advisors into product advocates. Each club was given sample product for the advisors to use, along with posters and newsletters and a $10 off coupon for product trial. The program also included branded apparel and an advisors manual with tips on how to engage members in conversation about the Crest line of whitening products.

The program was very successful and was renewed and expanded for a second year to include a Crest-sponsored a makeover contest for the Curves member with the best story about how having a great smile made a difference in their life.

Lavalife (Canada’s top online personals site) was also brought on as a partner as it represented another opportunity to speak directly with targeted audiences who were also engaged in life-changing activities. Crest sponsored the “send a smile” functionality within Lavalife, as well as a “Smile of the Month” contest with product prizing and a grand prize of a cruise. Targeted banners within the Lavalife environment also directed users to sign up to receive a $10 off coupon.

Landscape design/build identity: Thinking “Outside”

When the owner of a small-but-growing landscape design/build company approached me for a new visual identity, he stated his goals were to differentiate himself from his competition, and to potentially target a slightly more upscale, sophisticated clientele.

He already had the name, business cards, and a simple website, but none of it was working together, and it fell into the all-too-common-for-the-marketplace “green” aesthetic. He wanted something different, that set him apart in his creation of beautiful, livable, and sustainable outdoor spaces.

After doing a competitive audit to see what else was in play, it became clear that for true differentiation in the landscape sector, we had t avoid the conventional thinking and clichés that pretty much defined an entire market.

Rather than focus on the execution – trees, flowers, decks, fences, stone work, etc. – a more conceptual approach was taken that focuses more on the creative process.

Outside - logo

The symbol and colour represent unconventional, uninhibited, “outside” creative thinking. Colouring outside the lines, with the company signature “O” formed in the negative space. The warm and vibrant orange colour was chosen as a direct contrast to the blues and greens so often seen in the landscaping business.

Outside - truck (left)

The result is a bold and distinctive identity that supports and communicates the Outside brand: Outside spaces and outside creativity.

Outside - truck (tailgate)

The tagline, “Spend more time Outside” was also developed to draw more attention to the company name and the play on words. Both horizontal and vertical lock-ups of the identity were created to allow flexible placement on vehicles, equipment, uniforms, and lawn signs.

Outside – lawn sign

The results were immediate and powerful, with many sightings, recognition, and recall of the company truck in High Park and Bloor West Village within days of the new image hitting the streets.

The client couldn’t be happier, and that’s the best result of all.